Kindness – Wesley Guest House http://wesleyguesthouse.co.uk/ Fri, 24 Sep 2021 03:46:12 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://wesleyguesthouse.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2021/03/cropped-icon-32x32.png Kindness – Wesley Guest House http://wesleyguesthouse.co.uk/ 32 32 Kevin’s Legacy Foundation Presents 5th Annual Color For Kindness 5K – WIZM 92.3FM 1410AM https://wesleyguesthouse.co.uk/kevins-legacy-foundation-presents-5th-annual-color-for-kindness-5k-wizm-92-3fm-1410am/ Fri, 24 Sep 2021 02:16:18 +0000 https://wesleyguesthouse.co.uk/kevins-legacy-foundation-presents-5th-annual-color-for-kindness-5k-wizm-92-3fm-1410am/ Add some color to yourselves and support the Kevin’s Legacy Foundation for its 5th Annual Color for Kindness 5K Walk / Run this Saturday in Holmen. The Kevin’s Legacy Foundation was established in honor of Kevin Romanowski. At the age of 16, he ended his life because of bullying and depression. Brian Sime, a board […]]]>

Add some color to yourselves and support the Kevin’s Legacy Foundation for its 5th Annual Color for Kindness 5K Walk / Run this Saturday in Holmen.

The Kevin’s Legacy Foundation was established in honor of Kevin Romanowski. At the age of 16, he ended his life because of bullying and depression. Brian Sime, a board member, told Z93 that Kevin’s parents and a group decided it was time to help others so they didn’t have to go through the tragedy that the Romanowski family had had crossed.

The Kevin’s Legacy Foundation began helping fundraising with the Holmen Community Center to start a community center and to name a room in Kevin’s honor. The Boys and Girls Club has now taken over part of this building and Kevin’s room is in the Boys and Girls Club section. Now the foundation is helping to fund this hall with arts and crafts etc.

Sime said, “We are also trying to fundraise for a scholarship foundation so that we can invest money towards those entering the mental health field to help. One life is too much to lose for this, so all we can do to help people so that they do not have to go through the tragedy of the Romanovsky. “

All ages and fitness levels are welcome to come for a walk, walk and run on the trail this Saturday. Participants will be soaked in six different colors as you descend the trail.

Sime added, “We have pearls out there that you will get, and each pearl color is a different thing. One is, you know, depression or suicide, they’re just different ways of thinking about things that might help another person in your life.

There is a silent auction at the event and Kevin’s grandmother has donated a beautiful king size Green Heart quilt that will be raffled off on Saturday.

There will also be a pancake breakfast from 8:30 am to 10:30 am that morning at the Holmen American Legion.

Follow Kevin’s Legacy Foundation on Facebook HERE and register for the event HERE.

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Volunteers strengthen communities with kindness, support | Item https://wesleyguesthouse.co.uk/volunteers-strengthen-communities-with-kindness-support-item/ Thu, 23 Sep 2021 19:05:20 +0000 https://wesleyguesthouse.co.uk/volunteers-strengthen-communities-with-kindness-support-item/ 1/2 Show legend + Hide caption – Volunteers manage various water points along the route from Fort Drum to Thompson Park during the 2019 Monument to Memorial Run. The Fort Drum Army Volunteer Corps helps community members find the perfect volunteer opportunity. (Photo by Mike Strasser, Fort Drum Garrison Public Affairs) (Photo credit: Michael Strasser) […]]]>








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Volunteers manage various water points along the route from Fort Drum to Thompson Park during the 2019 Monument to Memorial Run. The Fort Drum Army Volunteer Corps helps community members find the perfect volunteer opportunity. (Photo by Mike Strasser, Fort Drum Garrison Public Affairs)
(Photo credit: Michael Strasser)

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Community members gathered at LeRay Mansion in October 2018 for the inaugural Beautify LeRay Day event, where volunteers planted dozens of trees and flower beds throughout the historic district.  Volunteers make the heart of a community beat, and the Fort Drum Army Volunteer Corps helps community members find opportunities to give of their time and energy in meaningful ways.  (Photo by Mike Strasser, Fort Drum Garrison Public Affairs)








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Community members gathered at LeRay Mansion in October 2018 for the inaugural Beautify LeRay Day event, where volunteers planted dozens of trees and flower beds throughout the historic district. Volunteers make the heart of a community beat, and the Fort Drum Army Volunteer Corps helps community members find opportunities to give of their time and energy in meaningful ways. (Photo by Mike Strasser, Fort Drum Garrison Public Affairs)
(Photo credit: Michael Strasser)

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FORT DRUM, NY (September 23, 2021) – Volunteers make a community’s heart beat faster, enriching it with much-needed support and contributions that affect the lives of many.

Dani Reed, program manager for the Fort Drum Army Volunteer Corps, recently spoke at the Community Information Exchange on volunteer opportunities at and in the Tri-County area.

“The Army Volunteer Corps was designed to help individuals within the military community – and this can be soldiers, family members, dependents, youth, retirees, civilians – to find ways to volunteer, ”she said. “We’re here to help you connect and find what’s right for you. “

Reed said the number of people volunteering through the Army Volunteer Corps program has increased from last year, although the needs of some volunteer organizations are greater.

“People are still concerned about COVID-19, but with more people getting vaccinated, I think that’s why we are seeing our numbers increase steadily,” she said. “But there are a lot of opportunities for people to get involved and make a difference. By volunteering, you connect with your community and make it a better place.

Currently, 188 organizations are registered in the Volunteer Management Information System, with active volunteer opportunities listed at https://vmis.armyfamilywebportal.com/volunteer/opportunities.

“When you locate the organization and position that you want to volunteer for, there is a point of contact for that particular position,” Reed said. “You can call them and find out a little more about the organization and this position, and connect with that community. “

Ashleigh Pursel Carlin is President of the Fort Drum Chapter of GivingTuesdayMilitary (GTM), organized by military spouses and launched in 2019. Giving Tuesday was born in 2012 as a global movement to encourage and inspire generosity, whether through through random or organized acts of kindness. activities and events in the community.

“I heard about the GTM when we got to Fort Drum last year,” said Pursel Carlin. “I was looking at the various volunteer opportunities in the area. Kindness was needed after such a difficult year, so the mission continued within COVID restrictions. “

The Fort Drum Chapter is hosting a “24 Hours of Kindness” event on November 30th.

“From midnight we will be in the community making waves of kindness,” she said. “We have great ideas for spreading kindness throughout the Fort Drum community – schools, hospitals, first responders, the military – but our efforts are limited by the number of participants. “

To this end, they are currently recruiting more volunteers for the cause.

“The more volunteers there are, the greater the impact,” said Pursel Carlin. “Volunteers can participate in any capacity. We hold creative collaboration meetings to see how we can have the greatest impact of kindness. “

She said acts of kindness can be as simple as leaving a positive note on a neighbor’s car or a colleague’s desk, bringing a snack for guards and first responders, or coffee for staff. medical.

“One of our greatest acts of kindness is giving life by giving blood,” said Pursel Carlin. “We will have two locations in Fort Drum this year, aiming to collect 100 units of blood. It would be the largest blood drive in Fort Drum in about five years, if not more. “

More information on GTM is available at www.givingtuesdaymilitary.com or follow the Fort Drum chapter at www.facebook.com/groups/552789355462861/.

Pursel Carlin is also a program specialist with the American Red Cross, which has an office at the Family Resource Center, Bldg. 11042 on boulevard du Mont Belvédère. She said they were also looking for volunteers for blood drives and other special events in Fort Drum and the surrounding community.

During the global pandemic, blood donation was deemed safe and poses no threat to donors or to the country’s blood supply. Pursel Carlin said medical staff and volunteers adhere to safety protocols during blood drives.

“The Red Cross will ensure that volunteers adhere to guidelines and safety standards,” she said. “For anyone who is hesitant to participate in in-person volunteering, remote volunteering opportunities, such as social work, are available. “

Units of the 10th Mountain Division (LI) have volunteer positions for spouses within its soldier and family readiness groups – from leadership positions and key callers to members of the care team.

Volunteers receive training as part of the Mobilization and Deployment Readiness program, which is offered at least once a month depending on the position. Additional training can be scheduled and tailored to the needs of volunteers as needed.

“Every company, troop or battery should have an SFRG as a communication plan between command and families,” said Lynn Williams, mobilization and deployment readiness specialist. “It’s a commanding officer program that requires volunteers because it has to be a team effort to make it work.

Williams said spouses who volunteer become more connected to the unit, making it easier for family members to communicate and receive information from the command team.

“The readiness of the soldier and the readiness of the family equals the readiness of the unit,” she said. “The soldiers and their spouses are one cohesive team, so it’s not ‘us-and-them’. “

Reed said anyone who has questions about volunteering or is having trouble navigating VMIS can call him at (315) 772-2899. Community members can also register for a VMIS course at the Family Resource Center to learn more.

People can also find volunteer opportunities by following Fort Drum Army Volunteer Corps on Facebook at www.facebook.com/FortDrumArmyVolunteerCorps.

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Wife of veteran repays kindness to them https://wesleyguesthouse.co.uk/wife-of-veteran-repays-kindness-to-them/ Wed, 22 Sep 2021 21:30:04 +0000 https://wesleyguesthouse.co.uk/wife-of-veteran-repays-kindness-to-them/ ROBSTOWN, TX – Pedro and Raquel Lerma, the couple we recently featured on Veterans In Focus who had issues with entrepreneurs, were overwhelmed with the response to their story and the help they receive with their wards. bath. They say they wanted to return that cuteness, because that’s what they are. “It is our goal, […]]]>

ROBSTOWN, TX – Pedro and Raquel Lerma, the couple we recently featured on Veterans In Focus who had issues with entrepreneurs, were overwhelmed with the response to their story and the help they receive with their wards. bath.

They say they wanted to return that cuteness, because that’s what they are.

“It is our goal, my husband and I, to help,” said Raquel Lerma.

After receiving help when needed, the Lermas wanted to help someone else. A motorized scooter that belonged to Raquel’s father, Manuel Moreno, provided the opportunity.

“It’s important for me to keep the faith, to give it to someone who really needs it,” said Lerma. “I could have sold it, but I don’t need the money.”

With our help, Lerma found the perfect recipient in Ron Saddler. A veteran like his father; a Vietnam veteran like her husband.

“Since my dad was a veteran, what more (fitting) than giving to a vet?” Lerma said.

“I don’t have a lot of lung capacity,” Saddler said. “Agent Orange pulled it out. I cannot walk more than 100 feet at the most.

Saddler has needed a scooter for over a year since Hurricane Hanna took him away. Thanks to the Lermas, this former captain of the 101st Airbone Div. will find daily tasks a little easier.

He said he was more than grateful.

“You have no idea,” Saddler said. “I can take this and go check my mail without getting in my car, start it to go check it.”

When the Lermas first told KRIS Communications about the scooter, they mentioned that it needed a new battery. They decided to pay for one themselves, to make sure the scooter worked for whoever received it.

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New children’s book teaches the importance of kindness, trust, faith and love https://wesleyguesthouse.co.uk/new-childrens-book-teaches-the-importance-of-kindness-trust-faith-and-love/ Wed, 22 Sep 2021 04:04:15 +0000 https://wesleyguesthouse.co.uk/new-childrens-book-teaches-the-importance-of-kindness-trust-faith-and-love/ I hope readers will realize that acts of kindness make a difference and that there may be someone to look after us when needed. TOWNSHIP OF SPRINGFIELD, NJ (PRWEB) September 22, 2021 Lynette Catalano loves snowmen. But she can’t find many books written about a female snowman in the Snowman World. She wanted to write […]]]>

I hope readers will realize that acts of kindness make a difference and that there may be someone to look after us when needed.

Lynette Catalano loves snowmen. But she can’t find many books written about a female snowman in the Snowman World. She wanted to write something different from the daily history of snowmen. It is for this reason that she wrote “The SnowMom” (published by Trafford Publishing), an illustrated story that promotes faith, trust and love.

On a magical snowy night, the first SnowMom was born. She is not what you would expect and is friendly and kind to the animals of the forest. Readers are invited to find out how SnowMom helps three helpless children in perhaps their greatest need.

“Children will fall in love with the animals and the SnowMom character while parents will enjoy reading a book to their children that teaches the importance of kindness, trust, faith and love. It’s also a nice winter story on a SnowMom, ”says Catalano.

When asked what she wanted the reader to take away from the book, Catalano replied: “I hope readers will realize that acts of kindness make all the difference and that there just might be someone there. one who watches over us in times of need. ” For more details on the book, please visit https://www.trafford.com/en/bookstore/bookdetails/833646-the-snowmom

“The snow mom”

By Lynette Catalano

Hardcover | 8.5 x 11 inches | 30 pages | ISBN 9781698709413

Soft cover | 8.5 x 11 inches | 30 pages | ISBN 9781698709390

Electronic book | 30 pages | ISBN 9781698709406

Available on Amazon and Barnes & Noble

About the Author

Lynette Catalano lives with her husband in New Jersey. She enjoys going to the beach looking for seashells and taking long walks along the shore with her family, friends and dogs. This is her second children’s book and loves to write stories and poems for children. She attended the College of New Jersey and Walden University. Recently retired from teaching, she looks forward to writing more children’s books in the future.

Trafford Publishing, an Author Solutions, LLC, publisher of author services, was the first publisher in the world to offer an “on-demand publishing service” and has led the independent publishing revolution since its inception in 1995. Trafford was also one of the first publishers to use the Internet to sell books. Over 10,000 authors from over 120 countries have used Trafford’s experience to publish their books themselves. For more information on Trafford Publishing, or to publish your book today, call 844-688-6899 or visit trafford.com.

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With an emphasis on kindness, a dream year blossomed in the classroom https://wesleyguesthouse.co.uk/with-an-emphasis-on-kindness-a-dream-year-blossomed-in-the-classroom/ Tue, 21 Sep 2021 09:05:54 +0000 https://wesleyguesthouse.co.uk/with-an-emphasis-on-kindness-a-dream-year-blossomed-in-the-classroom/ As more than three million New York students return to class, many of them, along with their teachers, are once again laden with anxiety and uncertainty ahead of another year of COVID-19 restrictions. As a long-time educator, I shared these fears last fall, before my principal allowed me to make this my “dream year”. This […]]]>

As more than three million New York students return to class, many of them, along with their teachers, are once again laden with anxiety and uncertainty ahead of another year of COVID-19 restrictions. As a long-time educator, I shared these fears last fall, before my principal allowed me to make this my “dream year”.

This encouragement, combined with smaller class sizes, fewer daily interruptions, and less pressure from the bureaucrats in Albany, helped me imagine and realize the potential of what my class could be. Introducing students to mindfulness lays the foundation for kindness, non-judgment, respect, gratitude, and patience with ourselves and others.

My 9 year old students learned how awareness of the breath made us feel soothed and relaxed, and can be applied to alleviate stress and trauma. We channeled that state of thinking and wrote what we were grateful for on gratitude slips.

Our understanding of how the power of mindfulness can impact our moods and responses has begun to permeate the fabric and structure of all of our interactions in the classroom. The way the children listened and responded to each other was gentler, more helpful, kinder.

Gratitude is powerful. During the in-person teaching portion of the pandemic, everything had to be rethought. No birthday parties. No sharing of toys, food and learning tools. As a result of our reimagined traditions, the initial disappointment was replaced with excitement and bonding laughter as we reflected on the names, verbs and descriptive adjectives of the birthday child and formed them into poems. Gratitude and appreciation have replaced the sugar rushes.

The Japanese have long recognized the power of promoting engagement through a simple routine of sharing a cup of tea. Masked and three feet apart, every Friday my students spoke with a “reading buddy” to talk about the books they were reading over a hot cup of tea. Price Chopper generously donated a year of tea and hot cups. During those weird and isolated times when kids couldn’t play with their friends in person, tea and books created a new, hopefully lasting social bond.

The ripple effect of sharing kindness in its many different forms – and learning to express our gratitude in a simple way – helped create an environment where students felt safe and were willing to take risks – personally and academically. Everyone has grown up in all academic fields.

Unbeknownst to me, several students, including three students who often proclaimed they hated writing, began to team up to create mini passion projects to share with their classmates. When two of my minimalist writers forwarded me their 18 paragraph article on Revolutionary War, they included a signature for the publisher – a name I didn’t recognize. As it turned out, my students were enthusiastically talking about their writing on the return bus ride. A kid from another class caught a fever and also wanted to be a part of writing. An editorial staff was born! Students self-initiated and submitted poems, memory book, weekly journal, stories, jokes, trivia, sound dictionary, and space website.

The foundation of benevolence and respect for our differences provided much of the groundwork that allowed these projects to emerge. In previous years of teaching I would have felt too much pressure to weave mindfulness meditations, yoga, reading hundreds of gratitude sheets, brewing and serving tea to everyone, and playing games. daily.

None of this was a waste of time. On the contrary, even with a shortened school day, the emphasis on caring for oneself and others helped create an academic and social “dream year” for all of us.

As teachers, we must give ourselves permission to imagine and create our “dream years”. Reinventing new possibilities of kindness, joy, laughter, deepening the love of learning for students and for ourselves. Everyone’s experience will be richer.

Alice Chiappinelli O’Neill of Guilderland retired in June after 36 years of teaching, the last 29 of which were in the South Colonie Central School District.

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South Mesa Elementary completes second year of Acts of Kindness – St George News https://wesleyguesthouse.co.uk/south-mesa-elementary-completes-second-year-of-acts-of-kindness-st-george-news/ Mon, 20 Sep 2021 17:02:46 +0000 https://wesleyguesthouse.co.uk/south-mesa-elementary-completes-second-year-of-acts-of-kindness-st-george-news/ ST. GEORGE – While staff and students at many schools hope to leave some aspect of their 2020-21 school year in the past, South Mesa Elementary School has been so successful with a new fundraiser last year that it has brought the program back to the second round. Students at South Mesa Elementary School have […]]]>

ST. GEORGEWhile staff and students at many schools hope to leave some aspect of their 2020-21 school year in the past, South Mesa Elementary School has been so successful with a new fundraiser last year that it has brought the program back to the second round.

Students at South Mesa Elementary School have rendered service in a variety of ways as they strive to perform acts of kindness, Date and location not specified | Photo courtesy of Sara Patchett, St. George News

Rather than selling something door to door or hosting a community bake sale, South Mesa students spent weeks providing service in their homes, neighborhoods and classrooms.

Through the online fundraising platform Raise Craze, students reported their acts of kindness and asked for donations from parents, family friends and distant relatives.

Heidi Sorensen, whose daughter Elsie attends elementary in fourth grade, said she was happy to see fundraising return because of the effect it has on her child’s habits.

“I love that we have a fundraiser that benefits the community and families instead of parents donating their money and getting cookie dough or something like that,” Sorensen said. “It pulls the kids out of their egotistical behavior – instead of thinking about themselves or what they want to do, they start to think of little things they can do to help others.”

South Mesa Elementary teachers, administration and staff dance and applaud to celebrate fundraising success, St. George, Utah September 16, 2021 | Photo by Ammon Teare, St. George News

On Thursday, the school held a closing assembly to celebrate the end of the fundraiser. Students at South Mesa Elementary raised $ 21,783 and performed 1,414 acts of kindness, far exceeding last year’s totals.

Students who topped their score in terms of total giving or acts of kindness were recognized at the assembly, and classrooms that raised money or services were awarded with a movie day / a popcorn night.

Since Tessa Wieland’s third-grade class led both categories, her students opted to donate one of their parties to the runner-up in a final act of kindness.

Funds raised will be used to purchase more soccer goals and set up benches on the playing field for students to sit and eat outside. The remaining money will be used for after-school programs and for small things like a popcorn machine and cotton candy machine that the school will use in celebrations or as a reward for the students.

Students Who Performed the Most Acts of Kindness in Each Class Recognized at Closing Assembly, St. George, Utah September 16, 2021 | Photo by Ammon Teare, St. George News

The fundraiser was overseen by the school’s parent-teacher association and led by Sara Patchett, PTA President for the Primary School. Patchett said that no act of kindness is too small or too big – the point is simply to motivate children to be kind.

“The kids were so excited to do their acts of kindness, and they would come in every day and say, ‘Oh, I didn’t do an act of kindness yesterday, but I’m going to do it tonight,” “Patchett mentioned. .

A total of 283 students signed up to participate through the Raise Craze platform, and over 1,442 emails were sent by students to request commitments or to share their experiences with the service.

Ginny Nobis, director of South Mesa, said she saw many examples of kindness from students, many of which were aimed at people who are usually not in the spotlight. Nobis recalled his favorite example from this year’s fundraiser:

I was at the office and our postman came in and said, “What’s going on here? I said, “I don’t know what you’re talking about,” and she said, “I get mail from your kids all the time. I get thank you notes telling me how grateful they are for everything I do and bring the mail rain or shine. I’ve never had anything like it, and it’s been my week! ‘

Proud as she is of the hard work and charity of the students, Nobis said she was very pleased with the tone that has been set for the new school year and the principles that the fundraising has strengthened for the children and the parents.

“I think we had so much success with it because it had a message, and the message was kindness,” Nobis said. “I think we can all use a little kindness.”

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Copyright St. George News, SaintGeorgeUtah.com LLC, 2021, all rights reserved.

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Greater Bank Spreads Random Acts of Kindness with ‘Greater Vibes’ Free Coffee Initiative at Ruby’s Cafe Tamworth | The head of the daily newspaper in the North https://wesleyguesthouse.co.uk/greater-bank-spreads-random-acts-of-kindness-with-greater-vibes-free-coffee-initiative-at-rubys-cafe-tamworth-the-head-of-the-daily-newspaper-in-the-north/ Mon, 20 Sep 2021 07:30:00 +0000 https://wesleyguesthouse.co.uk/greater-bank-spreads-random-acts-of-kindness-with-greater-vibes-free-coffee-initiative-at-rubys-cafe-tamworth-the-head-of-the-daily-newspaper-in-the-north/ community, VISITORS to Ruby’s Cafe Tamworth had a pleasant surprise this weekend, with 70 locals getting their shots of caffeine for free through a local bank. The Greater Bank-led “Greater Vibes” initiative saw him partner with cafes across the region last week to provide free coffee to customers. In Tamworth, the Ruby’s Cafe, a participating […]]]>

community,

VISITORS to Ruby’s Cafe Tamworth had a pleasant surprise this weekend, with 70 locals getting their shots of caffeine for free through a local bank. The Greater Bank-led “Greater Vibes” initiative saw him partner with cafes across the region last week to provide free coffee to customers. In Tamworth, the Ruby’s Cafe, a participating venue, received $ 350 – the equivalent of 70 free coffees – to distribute on Saturday. The café’s new owner, Kellie O’Callaghan, said it was “great support” for a business that has just started. “I’m a client of the Greater Bank and they would pick a local cafe and pick us, which was so lovely,” she said. “We gave away all 70 free coffees and I hope people passed it on and paid for it next time.” READ ALSO: Greater Bank Branch Manager in Tamworth Dwayne Marshall said that with many people pushing hard in the community right now, they want to spread some positivity. “It was an initiative that the Great came up with because of COVID, trying to do something positive in the community,” he said. “We ran it through pretty much every branch and each branch named a cafe, and we contributed 70 coffees, $ 5 per coffee, $ 350 per coffee.” We tried to have coffees that were our local customers to give them a boost. He said the idea was to help spread good vibes in the community, with the bank also handing out free stickers with the words ‘Greater Vibes’ written on them. To someone else, ”he said. he said. Our reporters are working hard to provide local and up-to-date information to the community. Here’s how you can continue to access our trusted content:

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Lasagna Enjoys working to feed families, spread kindness https://wesleyguesthouse.co.uk/lasagna-enjoys-working-to-feed-families-spread-kindness/ Sun, 19 Sep 2021 18:24:00 +0000 https://wesleyguesthouse.co.uk/lasagna-enjoys-working-to-feed-families-spread-kindness/ BOISE, Idaho – While the COVID-19 pandemic has created challenges, it has also inspired acts of kindness. An organization formed during the pandemic with the goal of tackling food insecurity and spreading kindness during a stressful and uncertain time. Lasagna Love volunteers make lasagna for anyone who needs extra help preparing dinner. “It could be […]]]>

BOISE, Idaho – While the COVID-19 pandemic has created challenges, it has also inspired acts of kindness. An organization formed during the pandemic with the goal of tackling food insecurity and spreading kindness during a stressful and uncertain time.

Lasagna Love volunteers make lasagna for anyone who needs extra help preparing dinner.

“It could be surgery, it could be that they lost their job. It could just be a very busy time for them and they just don’t have one – they are just too stressed out to cook dinner for. their families, ”said Lasagna Love regional chef in Boise, said Holly Finch.

Lasagna Love hasn’t been around for long, it started at the start of the pandemic.

“It actually started during COVID because of all the people losing their jobs and then it kind of spread from there,” Finch said.

Finch said that because of COVID, volunteers cannot meet the people they cook for, but they can see the shared story when the person requested a meal.

“I think my favorite so far is a girl with breast cancer. Her story was like I just couldn’t cook for my family, for my husband and that added to her stress,” he said. said Finch.

When Finch heard about Lasagna Love and started volunteering, the organization had not yet expanded to Boise, but now the need is growing faster than the number of volunteers. She said she used to be paired up with a family to cook lasagna every two weeks, but now she sometimes makes two or three lasagna a week, but still can’t meet the needs.

“I have 20 families that aren’t matched every week, so I need more volunteers,” Finch said.

Finch said volunteers can cook as often as they like; they don’t have to make lasagna every week. If you are interested in volunteering, click here.

To request a meal for yourself or for someone else, click here. You can request a meal every 28 days.

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SOMETHING TO CONSIDER: He was cuteness embodied | Lifestyles https://wesleyguesthouse.co.uk/something-to-consider-he-was-cuteness-embodied-lifestyles/ Sun, 19 Sep 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://wesleyguesthouse.co.uk/something-to-consider-he-was-cuteness-embodied-lifestyles/ Last week I reflected and wrote about the important task of captivating our thoughts regarding fulfilling the commandment to be kind to one another in Paul’s letter to the Ephesians. This week I would like to focus on that word: kindness. As with any word, looking at its definition and asking certain questions helps flesh […]]]>

Last week I reflected and wrote about the important task of captivating our thoughts regarding fulfilling the commandment to be kind to one another in Paul’s letter to the Ephesians.

This week I would like to focus on that word: kindness. As with any word, looking at its definition and asking certain questions helps flesh out its nature and what it looks like in action.

The Greek word “chrstos,” which Paul used in Ephesians 4:32, has two connotations: something that is fit for use (useful) and something manageable with regard to pleasure or benevolence.

Putting the two together I think it can describe the nature of cuteness. So, a kind person is one who is able to fulfill his goal of being benevolent to another.

But how does it feel to be a nice person? Does it just mean to be openly and obnoxiously “nice”, always with a smile on your face? I don’t believe that’s what Paul meant. Kindness is a state of being, rooted in someone’s nature.

Take an old Aristotelian example: the Olympian javelin thrower who has trained his entire life for this purpose. He’s not always throwing a javelin.

However, due to his training, muscles and muscle memory, he is ready to throw a javelin at any time as he has nurtured and trained this ability to take hold in his nature.

If kindness is something all Christians should be and strive for, what does it look like in action?

I first got to know Msgt. Tim Hoover when we were on a simulated deployment to the 221st CCB with the Texas Air National Guard.

I was young, shy and very, very green behind my ears. Out of my element trying to learn how to pitch tents, set up networks and drive 10 tons, I was both nervous and excited.

Hoover had invited me to join him with a few others for a Bible study one evening after the day of service. Sitting under his teaching, listening to prayer requests, and talking with him and others in this small room after a long day refreshed me for the long ones to come during this training. Hoover was an example both in his leadership at TxANG and as a Christian.

Anyone who has served or worked under rulers and bosses knows the difference between one who is kind and one who is not.

It seems like an oxymoron to praise an Air Force Staff Sergeant for his kindness. The thought of kindness in the military seems paradoxical in relation to the nature of preparing for a potential conflict or war.

But Hoover embodied kindness in a way that enhanced his leadership abilities and made you want to serve under his leadership. He brought out the best of his men and women under his command, and everyone who served under him knew he was for them and cultivated them in their specific duties as airmen and as beings. humans to perform to the best of their ability.

I use Hoover as an example because it has been on my mind lately. Several weeks ago, he was admitted to hospital due to the Covid. Sadly, Hoover recently passed away in hospital. A sobering reminder of the reality of suffering and death in this fallen world.

I can confidently say that Tim was a really nice man. Always an ear ready to hear what’s going on in your life and find ways to lead in a way that treated people with dignity and respect – that treated us like human beings.

It was a pleasure to serve with and under him. I will miss our conversations about life and what the Lord taught us in the scriptures. You were an example of how to be a nice man and a leader in the midst of a wicked world, and you finished your run well.

Until we meet again, my friend.

God protects you.

Joseph Hamrick is a semi-professional writer and sometimes a thinker. He lives in Commerce and is a deacon at Commerce Community Church (C3). He can be contacted at jhamrick777@gmail.com

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For Sikhs in the Valley, a Painful Birthday is a Call to “Little Acts of Kindness” and Love https://wesleyguesthouse.co.uk/for-sikhs-in-the-valley-a-painful-birthday-is-a-call-to-little-acts-of-kindness-and-love/ Sat, 18 Sep 2021 12:03:38 +0000 https://wesleyguesthouse.co.uk/for-sikhs-in-the-valley-a-painful-birthday-is-a-call-to-little-acts-of-kindness-and-love/ Four days after the horrific attacks of September 11, 2001, Balbir Singh Sodhi was planting flowers outside the gas station he owned in Mesa when a man, enraged by anti-immigrant sentiments and allegedly seeking revenge for the attacks , shot and killed Sodhi. The man would later shoot a Lebanese-American gas clerk, thankfully missing, before […]]]>

Four days after the horrific attacks of September 11, 2001, Balbir Singh Sodhi was planting flowers outside the gas station he owned in Mesa when a man, enraged by anti-immigrant sentiments and allegedly seeking revenge for the attacks , shot and killed Sodhi.

The man would later shoot a Lebanese-American gas clerk, thankfully missing, before eventually returning to a local bar to brag about the murder.

Sodhi was a member of the Sikh faith, and their traditional attire has often made them the target of those who harbor hatred of the Muslim faith and who see their traditional turbans as an indication of the Muslim faith. Many also harbor hatred towards Sikhs due to anti-immigrant and other racist beliefs.

Just under a year after the events in Mesa, a white supremacist in Wisconsin opened fire on a Sikh temple, killing six people. The temple has since installed bulletproof glass and has security guards on site.

“It is painful to lose someone because of hatred,” said Rana Singh Sodhi, Balbir’s brother. Arizona mirror Wednesday afternoon as he prepared for a memorial service that evening to commemorate the 20th anniversary of Balbir’s murder. “We are celebrating his legacy and all the victims of hate crimes and all the victims of September 11, and this is a very painful time.”

Since 2001, Arizona has continued to be a hotbed of hate incidents.
There was a 26% increase in hate crimes in 2019, although the data is likely incomplete as many agencies still do not report to the FBI. Only 81 of the state’s 125 law enforcement agencies reported for 2020, according to FBI data.
Sodhi’s murder marked what would become the start of a new wave of Islamophobia and anti-Sikh hatred across the country. Sodhi was not a Muslim, his killer hated him because he seemed to be linked to the Muslim faith, a common theme in the attacks on Sikhs.
Sodhi had actually planned this. He was planting flowers in preparation for a press conference he planned to hold the next day with the Sikh community in hopes of calming nerves and educating people about his community and faith.
Islamophobia is a term used to describe fear, mistrust or hatred towards Muslims. It has also become a multi-million dollar industry.

The troubled history of Islamophobia in Arizona

In the years since Sodhi’s death, Arizona has seen its fair share of high-profile incidents involving Islamophobia, most notably in 2015.
It all started with a man named Jon Ritzheimer.
He gained notoriety for wearing a shirt bearing the inscription “F *** Islam” while marching in front of a mosque in Phoenix, ultimately leading to a protest in front of it. The protest included a competition to see who could best draw the Prophet Muhammad, which is deeply disrespectful to the Muslim faith.
Ritzheimer would later be involved in a litany of extremist activity, including being investigated for calling for the arrest of a Democratic senator and for his involvement in the Malheur Wildlife Refuge standoff for which he was subsequently arrested and pleaded guilty to.
The protest was also in part the brainchild of anti-Muslim activist Pamela Geller, a marginal player in Arizona politics for years and a leading Islamophobe. She was a strong proponent of the racist conspiracy theory that former President Barack Obama is a Kenyan Muslim – a theory that was reinforced by former President Donald Trump prior to his presidency and investigated by the former County Sheriff by Maricopa, Joe Arpaio.
Arizona mosques have been the frequent target of attacks by extremist groups.
In 2018, two women members of a local extremist group made national headlines for vandalism and theft at a mosque in Tempe.
Tahnee Gonzales and Elizabeth Dauenhauer broadcast live taking their children with them to the Islamic Community Center and tearing fliers from a bulletin board while encouraging their children to use Islamophobic language.
But Islamophobia in Arizona is more complicated than the more obvious incidents of protests and hate crimes.
In 2014, the Maricopa County District Attorney’s Office, which was headed at the time by Arizona Supreme Court Justice Bill Montgomery, hosted a training seminar by a man who previously claimed the former CIA Director John Brennan was secretly Muslim.
It later emerged that Montgomery spent $ 40,000 to bring in the speaker who admitted to having sex with a confidential informant while working with the FBI.
Four years later, Arizona Republicans would refuse to condemn the hosting of a similar conspiracy theorist who claimed Muslims wanted to take over the country.
The City of Kingman in 2018 promised to change after comedian Sacha Baron Cohen’s Showtime satirical series “Who Is America?” showed members of the town reacting badly to a proposed fictitious mosque in their town, one man saying the mosque would promote “terrorism” and another saying black people are not welcome in the town during the segment.
Islamophobia has led researchers to even examine how prejudice influenced the mass surveillance devices that were created in the aftermath of 9/11, and how they impacted Muslim and Sikh communities.
“I think it’s bad at airports for Sikhs and brunettes, in general, after 9/11,” one interviewee for the study said. “Even my 70-year-old grandmother sometimes sits at the airport to be questioned. She doesn’t speak English – I don’t really understand the logic of that.”

Responding to hate with compassion and kindness

Sikhs have been in the United States since the late 1800s and the first Asian American to ever serve in Congress, Dalip Singh Saund, was a Sikh. Sikhism is the fifth largest religion in the world, but a 2015 study found that over 60% of Americans knew nothing about Sikhism or Sikh Americans.
Sodhi himself immigrated to the United States in 1984 due to anti-Sikh violence in India. Independent estimates suggest that between 8,000 and 17,000 Sikhs were killed in the anti-Sikh riots of 1984, and many people have still not been prosecuted for their crimes.
“People need education,” said Rana Singh Sodhi, emphasizing compassion when addressing the Mirror. “(Balbir) has become a beacon of awareness.”
At the memorial on Wednesday, Catholics, Muslims, Christians and more came together to remember the legacy of Balbir Singh Sodhi. They replaced an American flag near where Sodhi had planted flowers and recited the pledge of allegiance before lighting candles to be placed in a memorial.
Although it was hatred that took Sodhi away from his family, friends and loved ones, the memorial service was a call to action for understanding, a message that Sodhi’s family hope will be the lasting impact of the night. .
Aashwin Sodhi, Balbir Singh Sodhi’s granddaughter who was not even born when her grandfather was murdered, told the crowd that there is one simple thing people can do to help.
“Small acts of kindness,” she said, encouraging those in attendance to help others when and where they could – just like Balbir did.


Arizona Mirror is part of States Newsroom, a network of news offices supported by grants and a coalition of donors as a 501c (3) public charity. Arizona Mirror maintains editorial independence. Contact editor Jim Small with any questions: info@azmirror.com. Follow Arizona Mirror on Facebook and Twitter.

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